Novak Djokovic hopeful of return to tennis tour in 2 weeks

Novak Djokovic hopeful of return to tennis tour in 2 weeks

Saying his right wrist is not as badly hurt as he feared, Novak Djokovic plans to be back on the tennis tour in two weeks, and at the French Open later next month.The right-handed Djokovic said in a statement Tuesday he’s been “assured” by doctors that he will be ready for upcoming clay-court tournaments, starting with the Madrid Masters on May 5. He would head to Rome the following week, and then to Paris, where play in the year’s second Grand Slam tournament begins May 25.”Fortunately, the situation with the injury is better than it first seemed,” said Djokovic, who is No. 2, behind Rafael Nadal, in the ATP rankings.Djokovic has won six major singles championships and needs a French Open title to complete a career Grand Slam. He lost to eight-time champion Nadal at Roland Garros in the 2013 semifinals and the 2012 final.Djokovic complained about pain in his right wrist last week while playing as the defending champion at the Monte Carlo Masters, and he wondered aloud whether he might have trained too hard on clay right after switching from hard courts, where he won Masters titles at Miami and Indian Wells.He wore a thick white bandage on his wrist while losing 7-5, 6-2 to Roger Federer on Saturday in the semifinals at Monte Carlo. After that match, Djokovic said he knew he did not need surgery but that he was going to have an MRI exam and get checked by doctors to see where things stood with the injury.On Tuesday, Djokovic said he’ll “need to continue with the recovery process and full medical treatments.” He also said he “will have to take a short break in order to recover as soon as possible.”The European clay circuit has events in Spain and Romania this week, and in Portugal and Germany next week.

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Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann Embrace Girl Power at ‘The Other Woman’ Premiere

Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann Embrace Girl Power at ‘The Other Woman’ Premiere

Image mf.gifLink: Kate Upton, Nicki Minaj and Judd Apatow also graced the premiere with their presence.read more

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Trailer Report: Last ‘X-Men’ Preview Tops Week

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‘God’s Not Dead’ Trailer
Shane Harper stars as a college student who has his faith challenged by his philosophy teacher (Kevin Sorbo) in Harold Cronk’s drama. Willie Robertson, Dean Cain and David A.R. White also star in the film, to be released on Mar. 21.
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Saskatoon resident tarps over "unsightly" public art

Saskatoon resident tarps over "unsightly" public art

Image tarped-over-public-art.jpgLuke Coupal calls the public art installation at the corner of Avenue C North and 33rd Street West “unsightly”. (CBC)A Saskatoon man says the black tarp he used to cover a piece of public art at the corner of 33rd Street and Avenue C is an improvement over the original display.”It’s literally two compressed bales of garbage,” said Luke Coupal, who’s lived in the neighbourhood for the past decade.”For anyone who has seen this piece of artwork, you’ll agree instantly that this is not achieving the objective of beautifying the city and improving the commercial area,” he said.After receiving no response after several complaints to his city councillor, Coupal covered the art on Sunday with a black tarp. He also tacked up a sign that read “Our tax dollars are for keeping garbage OFF the streets”.The tarp and sign were both gone within 24 hours.Artist’s intentThe artist, Keeley Haftner, had initially placed a small plaque beside the installation, explaining the pieces were a collaboration with Loraas Recycle, to bring attention to waste management. On Tuesday morning, that plaque was also gone.’Found Compressions One and Two” sits at the corner of 33rd Street West and Avenue C North. The bales weigh close to a tonne, and contain plastic bags and containers compressed by Loraas Recycling. (CBC)”I can’t say [Coupal's reaction] is completely negative, although it is certainly extreme,” said Haftner. She noted she worked at Loraas Recycling for six months before producing the piece. Her plaque also included a link to a blog featuring interviews with fellow recycling workers, inviting public comments.Haftner admitted she did not receive any feedback online about the installation,It was her first paid public project, winning a $10,000 grant in the City of Saskatoon’s “Placemaker” program last year.Mike Cochrane said the temporary recycling installation needs to move out of Mayfair, to another location. (CBC)Residents question location”I understand what she’s trying to do,” said Mike Cochrane, who owns a drugstore nearby. “She has the right to make art but at the same time this is recycling. It shouldn’t have been here as long as it’s been here.”"If she’d been complaining about negligent dog owners, does that mean we’d have a pile of dog feces here at the moment?”Both Haftner and the chair of the Visual Arts Placement Jury told CBC the piece was originally intended for the River Landing area. However, another temporary work was already in place there. Instead, city officials and the jury offered Haftner the spot at 33rd Street West and Avenue C North.”The question of beauty has been brought up a lot in this debate, which is a really provocative and sometimes problematic conversation,” she said. “I don’t think all work that is made in a public setting should necessarily be made with the mandate of making a space more beautiful.”Planning and development officials at the City of Saskatoon tell CBC the exhibit’s Mayfair location will be revisited at the jury’s next meeting on May 5.

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Aereo, T.V. broadcasters battle in Supreme Court fight

Aereo, T.V. broadcasters battle in Supreme Court fight

Image chet-kanojia-aereo-dongle-tv.JPGChet Kanojia, founder and CEO of Aereo Inc., has a longstanding fight with TV broadcasters over using and reselling their signals. (David Paul Morris/Bloomberg)Grappling with fast-changing technology, Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in the use of the internet.The high court heard arguments in a dispute between television broadcasters and Aereo Inc., which takes free television signals from the airwaves and charges subscribers to watch the programs on laptop computers, smartphones and even their large-screen televisions. The case has the potential to bring big changes to the television industry.But several justices expressed concern that a ruling for the broadcasters could hamper the burgeoning world of cloud computing, which gives users access to a vast online computer network that stores and processes information.Justice Stephen Breyer said the prospect makes him nervous. “Are we somehow catching other things that would really change life and shouldn’t?” Breyer asked.Paul Clement, representing the broadcasters, tried to assure the court it could draw an appropriate line between Aereo’s service and cloud computing generally. People who merely retrieve what they have stored should have no reason to worry, Clement said.But David Frederick, representing Aereo, said the “cloud computing industry is freaked out about the case” because it sees its $10 billion investment at risk if the court were to hold that anytime music or an image is stored online and then retrieved, the copyright law would be implicated.The discussion veered between references to Roku, a TV streaming device, and other high-tech gadgets on the one hand, and analogies to coat-check rooms and valet parking in an effort to make matters more understandable on the other. There was even Breyer’s quaint reference to a “phonograph record store.”Aereo’s service starts at $8 a month and is available in New York, Boston, Houston and Atlanta, among 11 metropolitan areas. Subscribers get about two dozen local over-the-air stations, plus the Bloomberg TV financial channel.In each market, Aereo has a data center with thousands of dime-size antennas. When a subscriber wants to watch a show live or record it, the company temporarily assigns the customer an antenna and transmits the program over the Internet to the subscriber’s laptop, tablet, smartphone or even a big-screen TV with a Roku or Apple TV streaming device.The antenna is only used by one subscriber at a time, and Aereo says that’s much like the situation at home, where a viewer uses a personal antenna to watch over-the-air broadcasts for free.Chief Justice John Roberts repeatedly asked Frederick whether the tiny antennas existed for any reason other than to avoid paying the broadcasters for their content. “Is there any reason you need 10,000 of them?” Roberts said at one point. He suggested that it might not affect his view of the case if there was no other reason.But Frederick said it was much cheaper for Aereo, backed by billionaire Barry Diller, to add equipment as it grows, rather than start with a single large antenna.Broadcasters including ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC and PBS sued Aereo for copyright infringement, saying Aereo should pay for redistributing the programming the same way cable and satellite systems must or risk high-profile blackouts of channels that anger their subscribers. Some networks have said they will consider abandoning free over-the-air broadcasting if they lose at the Supreme Court.The broadcasters and their backers argue that Aereo’s competitive advantage lies not in its product, but in avoiding paying for it.There are signs people are starting to forgo pay-TV subscriptions by relying on Internet services such as Netflix and Hulu Plus for television shows. A service that offers live television, as Aereo does, could make such cord-cutting even more palatable. A study last year from GfK estimated that 19 percent of TV households had broadcast-only reception, up from 14 percent in 2010.Broadcasters worry they will be able to charge cable and satellite companies less if they lose subscribers. But Aereo argues that broadcasters would benefit from increased advertising revenue from increased viewership. The company says many of its subscribers are under 30 and have never had cable service.Aereo founder and CEO Chet Kanojia recently told The Associated Press that broadcasters can’t stand in the way of innovation, saying, “the Internet is happening to everybody, whether you like it or not.” Aereo plans to more than double the number of cities it serves, although the high court could put a major hurdle in the company’s path if it sides with the broadcasters.The federal appeals court in New York ruled that Aereo did not violate the copyrights of broadcasters with its service, but a similar service has been blocked by judges in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. A district judge in Utah also ruled against Aereo, saying that Aereo’s service is “indistinguishable from a cable company.”The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York said its ruling stemmed from a 2008 decision in which it held that Cablevision Systems Corp. could offer a remote digital video recording service without paying additional licensing fees to broadcasters because each playback transmission was made to a single subscriber using a single unique copy produced by that subscriber. The Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal from movie studios, TV networks and cable TV companies.In the Aereo case, a dissenting judge said his court’s decision would eviscerate copyright law. Judge Denny Chin called Aereo’s setup a sham and said the individual antennas are a “Rube Goldberg-like contrivance” – an overly complicated device that accomplishes a simple task in a confusing way – that exists for the sole purpose of evading copyright law.A decision is expected by late June.

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Cannes: ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’ Star Adele Exarchopoulos Set To Return To Croisette

Image 2_autumns_3_winters.jpgLink – The actress stars alongside Reda Kateb in “Que Vive” directed by Marianne Tardideu which will unspool in L’Acid, a sidebar of mostly French indie titles which runs in parallel during the Cannes Film Festival.read more

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Long bans for Lance Armstrong’s former staff linked to doping

Long bans for Lance Armstrong’s former staff linked to doping

Image TheSkeletonTwins.jpgLance Armstrong’s former cycling team manager Johan Bruyneel, doctor Pedro Celaya and trainer Jose “Pepe” Marti have all been handed long bans from sport for their involvement in doping, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) said on Tuesday.Bruyneel was banned for 10 years, while Celaya and Marti got eight-year bans after the decision by the American Arbitration Association North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (AAA), USADA said in a statement.Armstrong’s tarnished legacy
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The trio all worked for Armstrong’s U.S. Postal Service team (USPS), which changed its name to Discovery Channel after a change of sponsors in 2005, and opted for arbitration when the charges were originally levelled against them in June 2012.”The evidence establishes conclusively that Mr. Bruyneel was at the apex of a conspiracy to commit widespread doping on the USPS and Discovery Channel teams spanning many years and many riders,” said the statement.”Similarly, Dr. Celaya and Mr. Marti were part of, or at least allowed themselves to be used as instruments of, that conspiracy.”American Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and given a lifetime ban for doping in 2012, finally admitting his use of banned substances in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey in January 2013.
”There is clearly something wrong with a system that allows only six individuals to be punished as retribution for the sins of an era.’- Johan Bruyneel, Lance Armstrong’s former cycling team manager
Two other doctors connected to the team, Spaniard Luis Garcia del Moral and Italian Michele Ferrari, were handed lifetime bans from professional sport by USADA in July 2012.USADA’s 2012 report said the USPS team had run “the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen”.Belgian Bruyneel is a former professional cyclist who was team manager for all of Armstrong’s seven Tour de France wins from 1999 to 2005.’Used as scapegoats’Often described as Armstrong’s right-hand man, Bruyneel enjoyed further success with Astana in 2008-09 before moving to run the RadioShack team, a position he resigned from when USADA published its report into Armstrong’s doping.”I do not dispute that there are certain elements of my career that I wish had been different, nor do I dispute that doping was a fact of life in the peloton for a considerable period of time,” the 49-year-old said in a statement on his website.”However, a very small minority of us has been used as scapegoats for an entire generation. There is clearly something wrong with a system that allows only six individuals to be punished as retribution for the sins of an era.”Bruyneel, who did not give evidence in the arbitration hearings in London in December, said he continued to dispute USADA’s jurisdiction over him and might still appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).Pedro Celaya was USPS doctor from 1997-99 before being replaced by fellow Spaniard Del Moral. He returned to the team in 2004.”The panel found that Dr. Celaya possessed and administered doping products, including EPO, blood transfusions, and cortisone,” the statement said.Spaniard Marti, who also refused to testify in front of the three-member arbitration panel, was a trainer for the team from 1999 to 2007 before going on to work under Bruyneel at Astana.He was accused by USADA of delivering banned substances “including EPO, testosterone, human growth hormone and cortisone” from Valencia to riders around the world and assisting with the use of them.The AAA panel “confirmed that” USADA had the authority to bring the cases because it had discovered the violations, USADA’s statement said.

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Tribeca: Aaron Sorkin Says ‘Steve Jobs’ Is ‘One of the Few Times I Ended Up Writing What I Set Out To’

Image aaron_sorkin_advice_a_p.jpgThis article is from: The screenwriter also touched on his upcoming adaptation of former John Edwards aide Andrew Young’s “The Politician” and apologized for the early days of “The Newsroom.”read more

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Author, Editor and Holisitic Health Coach Alexis Wolfer Talks Natural, Organic Beauty for Earth Day

Author, Editor and Holisitic Health Coach Alexis Wolfer Talks Natural, Organic Beauty for Earth Day

Home FashionHealth & Beauty   Author, Editor and Holisitic Health Coach Alexis Wolfer Talks Natural, Organic Beauty for Earth Day
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Apr. 22nd, 2014 | Comments 0 | Make a Comment   

Photos Courtesy of Alexis Wolfer

If you’re a fan of JustLuxe beauty articles you’ll know we have an unhealthy obsession with luxury skincare. We can’t help that $500 for a bottle of anti-aging cream sounds like a bargain, especially if it’s keeping those wrinkles at bay, so when the idea of DIY, natural beauty products came across our desks, we couldn’t help but scoff. But sitting down to really dig into the science behind these yogurt-honey-blueberry concoctions, gave us second thoughts about what we’re really putting on our face. Are those bottled skincare products doing more harm than good? What’s really getting absorbed by our skin? And can natural ingredients really rival those of our favorite products?

In light of Earth Day (and pure cat-like curiosity) we spoke with Alexis Wolfer, editor at The Beauty Bean, author of The Recipe for Radiance and certified holistic health coach for some answers about natural skincare. Giving us a little insight on how to make your routine organic, more eco-friendly and what makes true beauty, Wolfer offers up ideas and arguments that suddenly made us think twice about our bathroom cabinet—we’re switching up the clothes in our closets for more natural, environment friendly options—could we do the same with our skincare?

Alexis Wolfer

With an editorial background, Wolfer worked at several publications during school, finding her passion in beauty and healthy living. “I had all these jobs and internships throughout college and graduate school at women’s magazines in the fashion and beauty world which I love just so profoundly,” she explained. “And my last job while I was in graduate school was I was at Lucky Magazine. And it’s while I was there doing both human rights work and being in fashion editorial that I realized it wasn’t necessary for women’s magazines to make them feel badly about themselves in order to sell them things; I thought there was a better way to do this.”­­

Alexis Wolfer

Establishing The Beauty Bean in January 2010, she started the site as a way to give women the information and recipes needed to take control of their own beauty and create skincare that is tailored to their specific needs. Named one of the Top 10 Women’s Lifestyle Sites by Forbes, she curates daily content on food, fitness, beauty and the mind to empower women to become their most beautiful selves. Her new book, The Recipe for Radiance (which comes out today), is a how-to guide to help with a number of skin issues.  “It’s really more of a beauty bible for the woman who’s looking for the all-natural, easy, effective, time saving solution in her kitchen,” Wolfer explains. 

Alexis Wolfer

Making the switch from trusted beauty products to DIY, honey cleansers might be a big leap for some, but Wolfer saw it as a way of taking control of her beauty. “I was seeing all these things come across my desk as a beauty editor that we’re like ‘now it has blueberries!’ or ‘now it has acai!’ What if we go into our kitchens and start doing this all naturally and ourselves?” she asks. “I was so careful about the ingredients that I was putting in my body, but I was significantly less concerned about what I was putting on it until that moment.” As she built The Beauty Bean she realized from the feedback she was receiving that natural, organic beauty was bigger than she had imagined. “I had access to a lot of celebrities and every time I was talking to them I would always ask what their favorite DIY beauty tip was,” she explains, “And it really started out of curiosity, but I was always so surprised by how many women who have access to the latest and greatest in every skincare innovation and really, the unlimited funds to be able to indulge in them, were sticking to coconut oil and a Greek yogurt face mask.”

Alexis Wolfer

So why isn’t everyone ditching the biochem ingredients for all-natural, organic beauty? Well aside from having a terrible shelf life, it seems we’ve come to expect quite a bit from our traditional products. “The reason why real blueberries aren’t showing up in real skincare products is blueberries are only good on a shelf for a handful of days,” Wolfer explains. “And so by the time it gets put into a beauty product it’s so processed that you’re not getting the same benefit.” Even the care we take on storing our beauty products has some effect on what manufactures can and cannot put into our products. “We keep them in our hot and steamy bathrooms. The chemistry behind our beauty products really needs to be spot on in order for stuff to stay good for a long period of time, which is wonderful when we’re talking about the confidence of having something in your bathroom cabinet that you can grab on the go,” she says. “But when it comes to really getting the most effective ingredients in your skincare, the stuff that you find in your kitchen is often stronger, more powerful, better, cheaper, easier.” Which leaves us wondering—what exactly are they putting in there to preserve the product for that long, and do we want that seeping into our face? We’ll just say the idea of natural fresh ingredients is starting to make a lot more sense.

Alexis Wolfer

Having tried traditional products, DIY beauty and skincare recipes for many years, Wolfer let us in on some of her favorite ingredients. “The three things that I always find myself going back to are full fat Greek yogurt—it makes an amazing base for any mask, it has lactic acid which helps break down dead skin cells and reduce inflammation, it has probiotics which helps the bacteria on the surface of your skin and prevent breakouts, and it has healthy fats which moisturize without causing you to breakout,” she explains. “I also find myself often going to raw honey, which is a creamy consistency and it’s not as sticky as processed honey—it’s antibacterial and antimicrobial—it is actually the only natural food in the world that never goes bad,” she adds excitedly. “But because of its antibacterial properties it’s really, really wonderful for helping to heal any sort of a cut or a scrape, for any sort of acne, but it’s also a humectant which means it helps to bring moisture deeper down into your cells layers so it’s really great for dry skin. Also I find myself often working with sweet potatoes or pumpkins because of their vitamin A content.” 

Alexis Wolfer

With her almost ridiculous encyclopedic knowledge of foods, benefits, uses and nutrients it’s hard to not instantly want to run out to Whole Foods and go on an organic produce shopping spree. But for some of us (myself included), giving up your SK-II and La Mer is easier said than done. Besides is there anything quite as luxurious as smoothing on your favorite face cream? Wolfer thinks there might be. “I love the age-reversing wine mask—first of all I think it’s really fun to put red wine on your face,” she laughs. “I think it feels really indulgent; you need such a tiny little bit so it’s not like it’s going to take away from your bottle of wine, but the resveratrol in the red wine is such a powerful antioxidant, but it’s not stable enough to put in beauty products.” 

Alexis Wolfer

To help get your Earth Day started right—and hopefully keep you on track the rest of the year—Wolfer has a few suggestions for making an easy transition. “Some of the easiest ways to green your beauty routine, if you will,” she laughs. “I really love to use organic, cold-pressed, extra virgin coconut oil to remove my makeup, so not only is it a one stop shop for anyone who’s super lazy, but you don’t need any water—it will emulsify all of your makeup, even the most stubborn of waterproof eye makeup.” We gave it a try—not wanting to run too far too fast—and surprisingly it does works pretty well. It cleans makeup quickly without some of the tugging and pulling that can occur with traditional cleansers. “Coconut oil is really rich in folic acid which helps to gently exfoliate your skin,” she adds. “It’s going to help get rid of any clogged skin cells that are clogging your pores, but it’s also antibacterial and antimicrobial so it’s going to prevent breakouts.”

Alexis Wolfer

While all of this natural-DIY-organic beauty is meant to improve your skin and well-being, Wolfer confesses it’s not the true purpose of all her endeavors. “I hope that women realize that all women are beautiful and that these recipes are not about making you pretty. That this is a just fun and glamorous and exciting thing to be able to boost what you’ve already got,” she explains. “I also want women to know that they’ve got the power and they’ve got the control.” Sounds pretty great to us. We might have abandonment issues if we break up with our entire skincare line, but a little mixing and matching, or using natural, organic foods to supplement our favorite products is our new resolution—besides all that “natural beauty” everyone’s dying for in the summer? We’re pretty sure we just found out how to get it.

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Cannes Unveils Directors’ Fortnight Lineup

Image mf.gifOriginal link: The sidebar will feature Cannes regulars John Boorman and Bruno Dumont, “Tale of Princess Kaguya” from Japanese animation house Studio Ghibli and a restored cut of horror classic “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.”read more

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